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Great data – a road that will be more travelled

Part of: All-of-Government Procurement news

Liz Palmer, NZGP’s Director Enabling Services describes how great data, increased and shared transparency, and a roadmap towards automating data availability, will help support a better and brighter future of procurement.

“Two of the project briefs (for Procurement 2.0/Future of Procurement) we have been testing and refining over the last few weeks, involve data and transparency – and the digital systems that will lift our game,” says Liz.

“Across the sector there is wide agreement that good decisions, the evaluation of policies and practices, and public accountability all rely on quality information.  Without this, we are not able to make high quality, strategic choices about government spend, and provide the assurance that policy intentions are being delivered.”

“We also need a digital system that will help us simplify the procurement experience and make it easier for government and providers to do business. Current NZGP systems are dated, do not interact as an ecosystem and don’t cover the full procurement lifecycle. We need a system(s) that is intuitive, end to end and easy to use for 2,500 agencies!” say Liz.

“These are long-term ambitions and are part of a global movement to support great decision-making with user friendly systems and data.  In the short-term though we intend to work with agencies and suppliers to determine what we want, what agencies want, how all this data gets into any ‘data lake’, and how we start fleshing out tangible deliverables.

"We really want a more complete picture of where government is spending, who its spending with and what outcomes are being delivered. As Minister Nash said recently, this is an oil tanker, not a speed train and so change will be gradual and we will keep shaping and refining our best collective approach."

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